Café de Olla

There is a traditional way to make coffee in Mexico. The coffee is made in a clay pot, thus the name, pot coffee, café de olla. The drink is made with ground coffee, cinnamon and unrefined whole cane sugar called piloncillo in Mexico and panela in most of the rest of Latin America. The preparation is reminiscent of making Turkish coffee in that the ingredients are all cooked together. Our decided preference is to make this with healthy organic coffee.

 

Café de Olla

Café de Olla

 

How to Make Café de Olla

Traditionally you use a ceramic pot for this drink but for starters a sauce pan will do just fine

4 cups of water
3 ounces of panela or piloncillo
half a stick of cinnamon, preferable Mexican
4 tablespoonsful of ground coffee

Make café de olla in a sauce pan or ceramic pot on the stove top. Grind your coffee just before you start. Add water, cinnamon and panela to the sauce pan and simmer until the panela is dissolved. This takes just a few minutes. Bring the water to a boil. Add the coffee. Turn off the heat. Stir briefly and then put a cover on the sauce pan. Wait five minutes and pour the coffee through a filter or strainer into cups to serve.

Café de Olla de Liqueur and More

Café de olla can be a nice base for a liqueur coffee. Use Kahlua. In addition this is a traditional drink made in all parts of Mexico and there are lots of local variations including the addition of anise or cloves. Feel free to experiment once you get the basic recipe correct.

What to Eat with Café de Olla

If you are going to do it right you should drink café de olla with a Mexican meal. Mican cooking is a mixture of European (Spanish) and Central American. The basics are corn, beans and chili peppers from the Aztec side and beef, pork, chicken, goat, dairy products and European herbs and spices from the Conquistadores. If you are just looking to drink a little café de olla with a touch of dessert there are lots of dishes to choose from. Here is the list.

Alegrías
Arroz con leche, rice with milk and sugar
Bionico, a type of fruit salad with cream
Buñuelos
Cajeta
Capirotada
Carlota de limón
Champurrado
Chongos zamoranos
Churros
Coyotas
Dulce de leche
Empanadas
Flan
Glorias
Jamoncillos
Jarritos (spicy tamarindo candy in a tiny pot)
Leche Quemada
Obleas
Pastel de queso, cheesecake
Pastel de tres leches (Three Milk Cake)
Pepitorias
Platano
Polvorón
Rosca de reyes
Gorditas de azúcar
Tacuarines, Biscochos, or Coricos

The point being that there are lots of good things to eat with a cup of café de olla. Make sure to look or organic ingredients along the way. As with all coffee based drinks the quality starts with the best coffee so look for organic. Grind just before you make the coffee and store your coffee in a cool and dry place.

Cold Brewed Coffee

On a hot day you might like to enjoy a cold brew, cold brewed coffee that is. Cold brewed coffee is steeped in room temperature or even cold water for half a day. It can be served cold or hot. Cold brewed coffee is not iced coffee, which is regular coffee poured over ice to make a cool drink. Cold brewed coffee has to do with the process and not the temperature at which it is served. Additional ingredients to cold brewed coffee include extra water, milk, and chocolate.

Why Cold Brewed Coffee?

Cold brewed coffee is about two thirds less acidic than expresso or percolator coffee. It has to do with extracting caffeine and healthy antioxidants but less acid using a slow, cool extraction process. Basically the coffee just diffuses out of the ground beans over a few hours.

Making Cold Brewed Coffee

Our preference is to start with organic coffee, preferably one of the Colombian organic coffee brands. Grind the beans but coarse and not fine like you would with expresso. Ideally use bottled water and not chlorinated from the tap. If you do use tap water pour the water into a pitcher and allow to sit for several hours to let the chlorine evaporate from the tap water. Grind four and half ounces (1 ¾ cup) of coffee. Add three and a half cups of cold water to a two quart pitcher and then the coffee grounds. Cover, place in the refrigerator and forget for a dozen hours.

Serving Cold Brewed Coffee

The rap against iced coffee is that pouring hot brewed coffee or even espresso over ice typically results on dilute albeit cold coffee. Cold brewed coffee is often stronger than regular coffee. Before serving pour the coffee through a filter or use a French press to remove the coffee grounds. Add a little water if the coffee is too strong for your taste and a little ice if you want it to be colder. Many folks add milk, sugar, chocolate or even liquor making it cold brewed liqueur coffee. This is an ideal drink for a hot summer day but works well in front of a roaring fire in winter as well. From our liqueur coffee article here is a list of liqueurs and how to make.

Name of Liqueur Coffee and Liqueur Used

Gaelic coffee: (Drambuie or Glayva)
Irish Coffee: (Whiskey)
Brandy Coffee: (Brandy)
Keoke Coffee: (Brandy and Kahlúa)
English Coffee: (Gin)
Calypso Coffee: (Tia Maria or Kahlúa and Rum)
Jamaican Coffee: (Tia Maria & Rum)
Shin Shin Coffee: (Rum)
Baileys Irish Cream Coffee
Monk’s Coffee: (Bénédictine)
Seville Coffee: (Cointreau)
Witch’s Coffee: (Strega)
Russian Coffee: (Vodka)
Priest Coffee: (Brennivín)
Corfu Coffee: (Koum Quat liquor)
Kaffee Fertig: (Coffee: with Swiss prune schnapps)
Caffè corretto: (grappa, brandy or Sambuca)

Making Cold Brewed Liqueur Coffee

  • Use a clear liqueur coffee glass and pre heat it
  • Add 25 ml of liqueur of choice
  • Mix in one teaspoonful of raw cane sugar, preferable organic
  • Make Cold Brewed Coffee As Described
  • Fill the glass to one inch from the top with coffee
  • Add slightly whipped cream, pouring over the back of a spoon so that it layers over the top of the coffee and liqueur mixture

Macchiato, Mazagran and Mélange Coffees

Three interesting coffee beverages are macchiato, mazagran and mélange. All are best made with healthy organic coffee. Here is a bit of info about each of them.

Macchiato

The name of this coffee drink means stained. It is essentially espresso with just a dash of foamed milk. It is similar to but stronger than a cappuccino. Milk is foamed directly into the espresso cup and the espresso is added. Cocoa is usually sprinkled over the top. A long macchiato has two shots of espresso and a little extra water and a short macchiato has one shot of espresso and less water.

Mazagran

This is a cold coffee drink. It came from Algeria where it is served in a tall glass. Mazagran consists of coffee poured over ice with the addition of various amounts of sugar, rum, lemon or extra water.

Mélange

This is a popular drink in Europe, particularly the Netherlands, Austria and Switzerland. It originated in the 1700s as a café drink in Austria and is often called Wiener Mélange, Wein being the German word for Vienna. Make mélange by combining equal amount s of espresso and steamed milk plus milk foam.

Always Organic

Our preference is for organic coffee and or all organic ingredients. For help finding organic ingredients visit this link. Like organic coffee, other organic foods are certified by the United States Department of Agriculture, the USDA. If you are in doubt about where to find organic ingredients follow the links on the organic ingredient site. If you are in doubt about what constitutes an organic food or drink read the excerpt from the USDA web site.

Start with Espresso

Most coffee beverages are variations on coffee house coffee and start with espresso. Espresso is very concentrated coffee that retains a lot of dissolved as well as suspended solids from the roasted coffee bean. It is made by forcing steam (boiling water) through fine ground coffee. It has a thicker feel because of the suspended solids and foam because of the pressurized steam. Espresso concentrates the flavors of coffee and is served in a small cup, usually an ounce (30 cc). A cup of espresso typically has between 40 and 75 milligrams of caffeine while a standard cup of percolated coffee contains about twice this much but in an 8 ounce cup. Thus coffee house coffee espresso is about four times more concentrated than the cup of coffee that you had a home for breakfast. Because espresso contains more coffee per ounce also contains more organic coffee antioxidants if you insist on organic for your espresso.

Here are the basic coffee house coffees made from espresso.

Americano

Americano is a coffee house coffee made from espresso and diluted with water. This goes back to the World War II era and after when GI’s who were used to Mom’s home perked or boiled coffee asked the barista to add water to their espresso to make it less strong. Think “weak espresso.”

Breve and Latte

Both of these are made with espresso and foam. Latte is made with steamed milk and breve is made with half and half. For latte think “coffee with milk” or café au lait and for breve think “coffee with milk and cream.”

Cappuccino

Cappuccino is made with espresso plus hot milk plus lots of steamed foam.

Mocha

Mocha is for coffee and chocolate lovers. It is made with espresso plus chocolate syrup plus milk.

Coffee in Vietnam

Vietnam is the second greatest coffee producer in the world. Only Brazil grows more coffee. But Vietnam grows primarily Robusta coffee as opposed to Arabica coffee grown throughout the Americas. Robusta coffee has more coffee per bean and is a more bitter coffee than Arabica. Thus when you ask for coffee in Vietnam you always get it with a layer of sweetened condensed milk layered on top. The drink is very strong and very sugary. Coffee in Vietnam is served hot or cold.

History of Coffee in Vietnam

Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in 1857 when the French were the colonial masters of French Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos). The costal highlands that run the length of this 1000 mile long country are ideal for coffee production. Vietnam was reunified in 1975 at the end of the French colonial period and then the Vietnam War. The government promoted coffee production and exports. By the 21st century coffee was only surpassed by rice as a Vietnamese export. The World Bank was instrumental in providing financing to coffee farmers as well as other farmers in Vietnam. Growers in other coffee growing nations blame the recurring excess of coffee supplies on the World Bank and its efforts. Nestle gets much of the caffeine for its various drinks from Vietnamese robusta coffee beans. Vietnam currently produces about 1.7 million tons of Robusta coffee a year.

Drinking Coffee in Vietnam

In Vietnam as in other nations of the world coffee is a social drink. There are coffee shops and coffee is served in restaurants. Coffee is made with a phin, a small cup with a filter chamber to catch the grounds. Grounds are added to the phin and hot water is poured in. the coffee drips into your cup. This is done at the table so you get to wait and watch it happen. Add sweetened condensed milk and you are ready to enjoy coffee in Vietnam. Additional additives to coffee in Vietnam beside condensed milk are eggs, yogurt, butter and cheese. In the capital city of Hanoi a traditional drink is egg coffee which is egg yolk, coffee powder, sweetened condensed milk , butter and cheese. The drink is served hot.

Here is a photo of a Vietnam coffee maker, a phin. Click on the image for more info.

vietnam coffee maker

The Caffeine in Your Soda, etc.

The majority of coffee in Vietnam is used to provide caffeine for various caffeinated beverages but not coffee. Nescafe instant coffee is made with robusta coffee beans, primarily from Vietnam. Nestle is a major buyer of Vietnamese coffee but so are other makers of caffeinated drinks. Other major growers of Robusta coffee for this purpose are Indonesia and Brazil.

Drinking Your Coffee in Vietnam

Vietnam is a beautiful country and as time has passed since the Vietnam War many Americans have come back, peacefully, to visit. The cities are bustling and the countryside is gorgeous. You can sit in a café and drink your Robusta coffee with sweet and condensed milk or with some of the other more exotic ingredients. Getting around usually requires air travel as there is no interstate system connecting this thousand mile long country from top to bottom.

 

Galão, Guillermo or Green Eye Coffee?

Here are three coffee house coffee variations with espresso as the base. Galão is from Portugal and only takes one shot of expresso. Guillermo includes slices of lime and two shots of espresso. Green eye is also known as Triple Death as it starts with regular coffee and adds three shots of espresso. Here are instructions for how to make Galão, Guillermo or Green Eye Coffee.

Galão

Galão can be made with one part espresso and three parts foamed milk but it can also be made with one part espresso and one part foamed milk. The first way to make Galão is served in a tall glass and the second called meiia de leite is served in a coffee cup.

Make espresso with healthy organic coffee. Foam the milk with hot steam as you would with latte. Add the espresso.

Guillermo

You can make Guillermo hot or cold and with or without milk. Make the espresso as you normally world. Slice up a lime and put in a coffee cup. Pour the espresso over the limes and enjoy. For the cold variety add lime slices and ice to a tall glass and then pour in the espresso, two shots. Add a touch of milk if you desire.

Green eye

Green eye is also known as triple death because it contains a LOT of coffee. Use one of the excellent Colombian organic coffee brands to make a strong dark roast coffee. Using the same coffee make a triple shot of espresso. Add the triple shot of espresso to the dark roast coffee in a tall cup and enjoy.

How Much Caffeine Do You Need?

Coffee has lots of health benefits and several of these are a direct result of the caffeine in coffee. But, you do not necessarily need to drink all of your caffeine at one sitting. Thus our preference of the three coffees lists is the Galão. It only requires a shot of espresso and comes nicely mixed with foamed milk. Our second choice is the Guillermo with the unique addition of lime. Our preference for an all-night drive across the entire country is Green Eye.

Many Ways to Prepare Coffee

There are many ways to prepare coffee. Here are a few with links to articles about history and preparation.

Turkish coffee
Touba coffee
Café Medici
Black tie coffee
Café Bombón
Rüdesheimer kaffee
Eggnog latte
Liqueur coffees

To these you can add Galão, Guillermo and Green Eye Coffee.

Always Organic

Always remember that organic coffee is better. It is free of the more than 100 impurities found in regular commercial coffee and is better for the environment. Look for certification by the USDA, Rainforest Alliance or UTZ on the label. Organic coffee differs from regular coffee in several aspects. The soil in which organic coffee is grown must have been verified as free from prohibited substances for at least three years. In addition there must be distinct boundaries between land on which organic coffee is grown and land where pesticides, herbicides, and prohibited chemical fertilizers are used. This guarantees that drift of substances sprayed or otherwise applied on adjacent land will not contaminate the organic plot of land. Organic coffee certification includes the adherence to a specific and verifiable plan for all practices and procedures from planting to crop maintenance, to harvest, de-husking, bagging, transport, roasting, packaging, and final transport.

Varieties of Liqueur Coffee

There are probably as many varieties of liqueur coffee as there are liqueurs. We would like to suggest that you make any or all of them with healthy organic coffee, preferably one of the Colombian organic coffee brands. Here is a list of some of the varieties of liqueur coffee and then we present a recipe or two.

 

Liqueur Coffee - Irish Coffee

Liqueur Coffee - Irish Coffee

 

Name of Liqueur Coffee and Liqueur Used

Gaelic coffee: (Drambuie or Glayva)
Irish Coffee: (Whiskey)
Brandy Coffee: (Brandy)
Keoke Coffee: (Brandy and Kahlúa)
English Coffee: (Gin)
Calypso Coffee: (Tia Maria or Kahlúa and Rum)
Jamaican Coffee: (Tia Maria & Rum)
Shin Shin Coffee: (Rum)
Baileys Irish Cream Coffee
Monk’s Coffee: (Bénédictine)
Seville Coffee: (Cointreau)
Witch’s Coffee: (Strega)
Russian Coffee: (Vodka)
Priest Coffee: (Brennivín)
Corfu Coffee: (Koum Quat liquor)
Kaffee Fertig: (Coffee: with Swiss prune schnapps)
Caffè corretto: (grappa, brandy or Sambuca)

How Do You Make Liqueur Coffee?

  • Use a clear liqueur coffee glass and pre heat it
  • Add 25 ml of liqueur of choice
  • Mix in one teaspoonful of raw cane sugar, preferable organic
  • Use a strong Americano coffee although some prefer espresso
  • Fill the glass to one inch from the top with coffee
  • Add slightly whipped cream, pouring over the back of a spoon so that it layers over the top of the coffee and liqueur mixture

Coffee for a Cold Night

We wrote previously about making Irish coffee. Irish coffee has its origins at the airport in Shannon, Ireland on a cold night to warm up passengers waiting for a transatlantic flight. Any of the liqueur coffee can fill this same need for a warm alcoholic drink with a coffee pick me up included. There are as many variations as there are varieties of liqueur coffee. For example, here are recipes for Gaelic Coffee and Calypso coffee.

Making Gaelic Coffee

Ingredients:

3/4 oz Irish whiskey
3/4 oz Irish cream
1 1/2 oz dark creme de cacao
2 oz milk
1 tblspful espresso

A few drops of green crème de menthe
Add the whiskey, crème de cacao and milk to a warmed coffee liqueur glass and mix
Sprinkle in a few drops of crème de menthe for color
Pour slightly whipped cream over a spoon into the cup to create a layer on top
Add another few drops of crème de menthe if you like

Making Calypso Coffee

Ingredients:

1 oz TiaMaria coffee liqueur
5 ounces of strong black coffee
1 ½ ounces of whipped cream
1 tsp sugar

Mix the liqueur sugar in the bottom of a liqueur coffee glass
Add the coffee
Pour whipped cream to layer out over the top

A Cold Night Can Be the Mother of Invention

Winter is coming and with it the need for an occasional warm drink. The basic recipe for liqueur coffee is a good place to start. Pick your favorite liqueur and your favorite organic coffee. Make sure to get organic cream and organic sugar. The point is produce not only a drink that tastes good but also one that is visually appealing as well. Do not be afraid to experiment a bit to arrive at your favorite liqueur coffee to please yourself and impress your friends.

 

Eggnog Latte for the Holidays

Winter has come early and the holidays are upon us. Buy Organic Coffee would like to vote for eggnog latte for the holidays as an appropriate way to make healthy organic coffee for Thanksgiving, Christmas and into the depths of winter. Here is a little information about eggnog, latte and how to make eggnog latte for the holidays.

Where Did Eggnog Come From?

Eggnog probably originated in East Anglia, England and has its roots in a medieval European beverage made with hot milk called posset. Nog comes from noggin which was Middle English for a small carved wood cup used to serve alcohol. At the time of its origin the drink was also called egg flip because the preparer flipped or rapidly poured it between two pitchers to mix it. An early reference to egg nog in the colonies in the 18th century is by Isaac Weld who wrote that

“The American travelers, before they pursued their journey, took a hearty draught each, according to custom, of egg-nog, a mixture composed of new milk, eggs, rum, and sugar, beat up together”

Making the Eggnog

Ingredients:

  • A dozen egg yolks
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 4 cups of milk
  • 1 cup of chilled heavy cream
  • Nutmeg, grated
  • ½ cup of bourbon, rum, or brandy
  • Preferably all organic

Preparation:

  • Use a medium saucepan.
  • Whisk the milk and sugar over medium heat until sugar is dissolved.
  • This takes a minute or two.
  • Use a large bowl to whisk the egg yolks.
  • Continue to whisk and pour the hot mixture into the yolks, slowly.
  • Put the mixture back into the cooking pan.
  • Cook over medium to low heat just below the temperature needed to simmer until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a stirring spoon.
  • This takes twenty to twenty-five minutes.
  • Pour through a strainer into a bowl.
  • Stir in the bourbon, rum or brandy and then the cream.
  • Garnish with grated nutmeg.
  • Cover with a plastic wrap and put in the refrigerator to cool.
Eggnog

Eggnog

Latte

Latte is a coffee house coffee made with espresso and milk.

Latte is made with steamed milk. For latte think “coffee with milk” or café au lait.

Eggnog latte

You have two choices here, hot or cold.

You can make espresso and cool it and mix into a cup made from the recipe for eggnog. Or you can start with the eggnog mix that is just mixed and warm and add your espresso for a hot eggnog latte. In each case you have a nice holiday drink with a little alcohol.

Alternatives, by the way, are Irish coffee and Rüdesheimer kaffee if you want an alcohol and coffee drink to warm you up on a cold winter’s day. But, if you want to be consistent with the season try making eggnog latte for the holidays and use one of the Colombian organic coffee brands to make the espresso.

Rüdesheimer Kaffee

A nice drink on a cold day is Rüdesheimer kaffee.  Rüdesheimer kaffee comes from Rüdesheim, Germany. In 1957 Hans Karl Adam made coffee with sugar and brandy and topped it off with whipped cream. Hans Karl Adam was a German television chef and very popular at the time. He dreamed up this drink and it became a hit in local coffee houses. If you are looking for an alternative to Irish coffee or if you have simply run out of Irish whisky, try making Rüdesheimer kaffee.

How Do You Make Rüdesheimer Kaffee?

We suggest that you start with healthy organic coffee, preferably one of the Colombian organic coffee brands. Any coffee cup will do but the best results are obtained with the special cup used in Germany for this drink. Go here to Weinquelle if you want a complete set.

Article:            Asbach Rüdesheimer Coffee set + 2 cups and spoons.
Country:         Germany
Region:          Rüdesheim, Rhein
Producer:       Asbach
Alcohol:         38% ABV
Flavour:         Floral notes, honey, grapes and slight wood note.
Taste: Harmoniously, moderate sweetness, winy with notes after plums, easily nutty.

Rüdesheimer Kaffee Cup

Rüdesheimer Kaffee Cup

Any brandy may work for making Rüdesheimer Kaffee, but to be totally correct use Asbach brandy. If you are having trouble finding this brand go online at The Whisky Exchange.

Asbach is a famous German brandy with an ardent cult following, particularly amongst British ex-servicemen, many of whom have developed a fondness for it while stationed in the country. This 3 year old is the sibling to Asbach Uralt.

Asbach Brandy

Asbach Brandy

Tell them that Buy Organic Coffee sent you.

Organic sugar and chocolate are next. Visit our organic ingredients page for help on this one.

Steps:

  • Grind the beans immediately before making the coffee. Make the coffee first but have the rest of the ingredients on hand because Rüdesheimer Kaffee is put together at the table.
  • While the water is heating for your coffee make the whipped cream. Adding a dash of vanilla sugar is nice touch.
  • Add a jigger of Asbach Uralt brandy and sugar cubes to a coffee up.
  • Flambé and stir for just a minute to dissolve the sugar.
  • Add the coffee, preferably espresso.
  • Spread whipped cream across the op and garnish with flakes of chocolate.
  • Serve and enjoy.

Enjoy this drink with a tasty dessert such as coffee cake.

Café Bombón

Café Bombón originated in Valencia, Spain and spread throughout Spain, Europe, Asia and the Americas. As the popularity of café Bombón spread variations in how to make it also occurred. When made in Malaysia as Kopi Susu Panas or in Thailand as Gafeh Rorn it is commonly made with ground coffee and sweetened condensed milk whereas traditional Café Bombón is made one to one with espresso and sweetened condensed milk. The drink is served in a glass instead of a cup and the milk is poured slowly to layer out beneath the espresso for visual effect.

Espresso and All Organic

First of all use healthy organic coffee and organic milk. (See our article about finding organic ingredients. This is essentially a coffee house coffee as its base is espresso. Espresso is very concentrated coffee that retains a lot of dissolved as well as suspended solids from the roasted coffee bean. It is made by forcing steam (boiling water) through fine ground coffee. It has a thicker feel because of the suspended solids and foam because of the pressurized steam. Espresso concentrates the flavors of coffee and is served in a small cup, usually an ounce (30 cc). A cup of espresso typically has between 40 and 75 milligrams of caffeine while a standard cup of percolated coffee contains about twice this much but in an 8 ounce cup. Thus coffee house coffee espresso is about four times more concentrated than the cup of coffee that you had a home for breakfast. Because espresso contains more coffee per ounce also contains more organic coffee antioxidants if you insist on organic for your espresso.

How to Make Café Bombón

First of all make your espresso, sufficient for each person whom you will serve. Pour into a glass instead of the traditional demitasse cup used for espresso. Use sweetened condensed milk in equal quantity to the espresso. Pour slowly into the espresso to create a base layer of milk before serving. Your guests may wish to add milk and or nutmeg and stir but that is their business.

The Age of Exploration and Spanish Coffees

The Portuguese and Spanish sailed the world in the age of exploration staring in the middle of the 15th century and continuing for nearly three hundred years until Spanish colonies gained their freedom. All variety of items came on ship to Spain including coffees of the world. Turkish immigrants were especially important in bringing coffee to Spain. Here is a short list of varieties of Spanish coffee:

Café Solo – small glass of strong black coffee

Café Con Leche – same as coffee house coffee café con leche

Café Bombon – read the article

Café Americano – watered down café solo

Café Cortado – strong black coffee with a drop of milk.

Café Con Hielo – iced coffee

Café Sombra or Café Manchado – coffee flavored milk

Café Carajillo – similar to Irish coffee but with rum instead of Irish whisky

How Do You Make Black Tie Coffee?

An exotic coffee drink is the black tie. This is a traditional drink of Thailand. A black tie contains black tea and espresso as well as a mix of spicy and sweet ingredients. Basically black tie coffee starts with traditional Thai tea and ends up with a double shot of espresso. Just how do you make black tie coffee?

Black Tie Ingredients

  • Black tea mix = 1 cup or 4 bags of black tea
  • Orange blossom water
  • Star anise
  • Crushed tamarind seed
  • Sugar ¾ cup
  • Condensed milk or cream
  • Healthy organic coffee

You can gather all of the ingredients for the Thai tea base or you can purchase Thai tea mix with tea and all of the ingredients added. An alternative is to simply use black tea but then you miss out on a lot of the taste of this exotic drink.

Black Tie Steps

Make the tea first and cool it.

  • Boil four cups of water and add tea and stir in sugar, boil for three minutes
  • Let the tea steep for half an hour
  • If using a Thai tea mix strain out the leaves
  • Or remove tea bags
  • Allow to cool and then put in refrigerator
Thai Tea

Thai Tea

Make expresso, a double shot for each glass of Black Tie

Pour tea into glasses with ice and add your double shot of expresso

Top off with cream or condensed milk, pouring slowing to create a creamy layer on top of the drink and serve.

History of Thai Tea and the Black Tie

Folks in Thailand used to buy their tea from Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) until it become too expensive. So they started using a semi wild tea that grows in mountainous regions of Thailand known as Bai Miang. They added orange blossom water, star anise, crushed tamarind seed and whatever other spices came to mind. They sweetened this beverage with sugar, coconut milk, whole milk or evaporated milk. This drink spread with Thai restaurants across Asia and to Europe and North America. There is little information about how people started adding espresso to this drink but a good bet is that this variation was created in a coffee house as a way to sell more espresso.

Black Tie Organic

If you want to go totally organic with this drink check our article about finding organic ingredients.

Variations on a Black Tie

This drink invites experimentation. Thai tea, which is the base of the drink, is made using a variety of spices and sweeteners in Thailand. The same applies to making it in your home. It is certainly a great drink for a hot day so make sure to prepare the tea early and cool in the frig and add a little ice before adding your espresso. Then sip and enjoy!